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Top Ten Top Ten Tuesdays: Books I Wish Could Have Had Sequels

Top Ten Tuesdays is an original feature created because The Broke and The Bookish is fond of lists. They love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see other’s top ten lists! Each week, they will post a new Top Ten list and everyone is welcome to join. Please link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your post AND add your name to the Linky widget.

This Week’s Question:

Top Ten Books I Wish Could Have Had Sequels

1. Will always be Michael McDowell’s Blackwater series. It’s true: six books isn’t enough when it comes to the mysterious saga of the Caskey family. There are just so many unanswered questions about what happened to the line of Alabama rivermonster women, and a totally unsecret hope that they just kept on being rivermonster women and continue to do so to this day.

2. D*U*C*K. This was a tough one. Because as much as I love G-man and Rickey, and as much as I salivate at the thought of Dead Shrimp Blues, the oft-talked about but never materializing sixth book in the series, I also respect Martin’s decision not to continue it. Maybe it’s even better that the series ended when it did, as this last novel in the saga of two New Orleans chefs and their crew, who travel down to southern Louisiana to cook a very special one-night meal, is far and away my favorite of the lot. But if Martin ever changes his mind, I will be pre-ordering with bells on.

3. Wicked Gentlemen by Ginn Hale. Hot gay steampunk with the kind of happy ending where you just know family dinners are going to be awkward. Well, I want my awkward family dinners! Gah! *bites fist*

4. The God Eaters by Jesse Hajicek, aka the book where I never looked the same way at cooking oil ever again.  I mean, it had to have taken a long time for the West to get settled. They must’ve had to stop rolling around with one another long enough to eat, or ride horses, or take a long bath in a cold stream, playfully splashing one another and scrubbing each other’s–

Okay, I’ll stop.

5. Split Ends by Charles Ogden, who was in reality a cabal of Star Farm Production writers. I say cabal because they did a dastardly deed here: Split Ends, the ninth book in the Edgar and Ellen series (Edgar & Ellen being two orphaned Addamsesque children who dug tunnels and practiced chemistry in a dilapidated town that was sometimes covered in maple syrup) ends on a cliffhanger, with a tenth book promised. Only… that book never materialized! The whole series ends on a cliffhanger! Nine books! It had scuba diving! And snark! And illustrations! I am still mad about this, btw. In case you had questions.

6. If I say Amanda Downum’s The Drowning City, will y’all just turn away in disgust as I quite obviously can’t stop talking about her books?

You will?

Okay, forget I said anything.

7. Saugus to the Sea by Bill Brown. I think by now it should be a foregone conclusion that water allotment in Southern California is subject to some kind of conspiracy (again) but this one’s my favorite. It’s a book about an almost dreamlike L.A., where people are conspiring with nature against Hollywood. It ends kind of– well I won’t spoil it for you but I really really need to know what happens next. Don’t make me fanfic it, Bill.

8. How to Cook a Tart by Nina Kilham / Reckless Appetites by Jacqueline Deval. Both are books about chefs who lose the romantic thread a little, both feature luscious descriptions of food, and both end in the same very unexpected way, in opposite directions, which is the best I can do to talk about these two without spoiling them sideways. Look, if you want to know more, let’s pop down to the comments to do this, and label it all HONKING BIG SPOILERS.

9. The Death of the Necromancer by Martha Wells. Jewelry theft, chases through steam tunnels and so many characters I could’ve followed for at least another three books. I love a good jewel theft. And a good tunnel chase! And paranoia! And crones! And snarkiness at court! Gah.

10. Peril at End House by Agatha Christie. Because it makes sense to wonder who bought the house afterwards, don’t you think?

Audrey1 Top Ten Tuesdays: Books I Wish Could Have Had Sequels





Top Ten Top Ten Tuesdays: Authors Who Deserve More Recognition

Top Ten Tuesdays is an original feature created because The Broke and The Bookish is fond of lists. They love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see other’s top ten lists! Each week, they will post a new Top Ten list and everyone is welcome to join. Please link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your post AND add your name to the Linky widget.

This Week’s Question:

Top Ten Authors Who Deserve More Recognition

1. Zen Cho

My heart does this weird little skip every time I find Cho has a new story out, because I know I’m going to love it as least as much as the last one. She writes magical realism and mythology-based fantasy usually set in and around Malaysia, and quite a few of her stories are available online for free. Far and away my favorite is The House of Aunts, about how you can never really get away from your family, even if you die trying.

2. Michael McDowell

McDowell wrote eco-thrillers set in the swamps of Alabama and Florida and they’re all just hands-down terrifying but with this beautiful AND THEN NATURE WINS AGAIN theme. Also: drowning towns ftw. Cold Moon Over Babylon, a story of greed and blueberry bushes, is pretty awesome but there’s really no substitute for his six-volume Blackwater series, which scares the pants off me to this day.

“In the first three books, the oldest heir encounters a woman after a flood, who makes lies about her past and eventually has marries him and has two daughters. It is revealed the woman can change into a flat faced, wide-eyed crocodilian-fish like creature that has powers over the river by the town as well as rains in the county.” If those sentences don’t make you run screaming to the library then namaste, the divine in me recognizes the divine in you, just before it drops down a second set of teeth and swallows you whole.

3. Mo Hayder

Okay okay: Mo Hayder is pretty well known in crime fiction circles as writing some terrible gritty things but I’d like to argue that the things she writes are so terrifying, so bowel-quakingly gruesome that she should really be much better known on the horror side of the house. I made it through Ritual, the book about the severed hands okay, but had to back over both The Treatment and Skin with my car. I can think of no higher honor for a horror writer except maybe soaking all her books in holy water, wrapping them in iron chains and throwing them in a bottomless lake.

Don’t think I haven’t thought about it.

4. Denise Vitola

I’m never sure whether Vitola’s books qualify as paranormal non-romance, or scifi or horror or all of the above, but I really like them. In Quantum Moon, a detective in the ecologically defunct future uses her powers as a werewolf to solve crimes. In The Winter Man, the only natural choice for a forensic hematologist is of course a vampire. Now if only she could get the rest of her un-life together. Plus The Red Sky File features a river monster!

5. BM Bower

is a pseudonym for Bertha Muzzy-Sinclair, which is a fabulous name, but Sinclair was writing at the turn of the last century, so it’s fairly obvious why she took a gender-neutral name to write Westerns under. And they’re glorious. My favorite is The Lookout Man, a Western with a naturalist bent set on a fire lookout hut on Mt. Shasta. More traditional ranches, cattle and tromping about can be found in Bower’s tales of the Lazy A or the Flying U (yes indeedy) or any of Bower’s 56 other Western novels.

None of these are paranormal romances or horror, btw. Just in case anyone was still keeping track.

6. Leah Bobet

Constructs sentences you could live in. Her stories Kimberly Ann Duray Is Not Afraid and They Fight Crime! are free online at Strange Horizons.

7. Mehmet Murat Somer

Okay okay, Somer writes mysteries, which are not technically covered on this blog, but if you like mysteries at all, and if you like Turkish drag queens (and who doesn’t?) I highly recommend Somer’s Hop-Ciki Yaya series, about a Turkish transvestite club owner/hacker who yes, FIGHTS CRIME.

8. Ginn Hale

Wicked Gentlemen = Doomed steampunk men in love.

Seriously, why are you still reading this article? Go get it, it’s phenomenal.

9. Christine Kling

True fax: I love boats. I love reading about boats and marinas and sailing and oceans. So does Kling, it turns out, and her books are all about living aboard and running around tracking down international conspiracies. Best of all possible worlds. Her short story collection, Sea Bitch, is another one I’d argue would be a great find for horror fans. It’s kind of like Roald Dahl retired to a marina in Florida. So good.

10. Daphne Gottlieb

Poet, author, tomato, tomato. Gottlieb writes horror poetry; smart, terrifying poems in the Carol J Clover vein, sometimes about horror films, sometimes about what’s like to be a woman.

Gottlieb has a bunch of poems up on her website, but I think my favorite might always be, forever and ever amen, “The Frightening Truth About Desire”:

it’s on but
i don’t know
whether i want
to be
her, fuck her
or borrow
her clothes.

Audrey1 Top Ten Tuesdays: Authors Who Deserve More Recognition





Top Ten Top Ten Tuesdays: Best Books Ive Read So Far In 2013

Top Ten Tuesdays is an original feature created because The Broke and The Bookish is fond of lists. They love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see other’s top ten lists! Each week, they will post a new Top Ten list and everyone is welcome to join. Please link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your post AND add your name to the Linky widget.

This Week’s Question:

Top Ten Books I’ve Read So Far In 2013

ash sign Top Ten Tuesdays: Best Books Ive Read So Far In 2013

Seeing as how I’ve barely hit 40 books, this shouldn’t be too difficult…

  1. The ENTIRE Seven Realms series by Cinda Williams Chima. BLEW. ME. AWAY. YA High Fantasy that delivers, peeps.
  2. Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer! While Cinder was a bit predictable, I am incredibly impressed with the world-building and fairy tale re-imagining. It is wicked fun!
  3. Under the Never Sky series by Veronica Rossi! I just have ONE word: ROAR!!!!!!!
  4. Endure by M.R. Merrick: Holy canoli! This series ended on such a high for me. I don’t think I’ve ever enjoyed an epilogue as much as this one. The entire book was INTENSE but damn, what a great ending to a fantastic series.
  5. Dead Living by Glenn Bullion: This is one of my favorite zombie reads! It just hit all the right notes. It had the best elements a zombie novel can have, and it had a wicked beautiful and believable love story. I want MOAR of those characters!
  6. Shatter Me series by Tahereh Mafi: I was not expecting the emotional connection to the characters in this series! I have to say, however, Warner’s point of view in the Destroy Me novella has been the highlight of the series for me.
  7. Game by Barry Lyga: O.M.G. people! Book two in the I Hunt Killers series blew me away! I mean, what an extreme ride of awesome. If you like serial killers, creepy/gory scenes, mysteries, male protagonist and awesomely funny sidekicks, you must check this series out!
  8. Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys: I thoroughly enjoyed this historical set in the 1950′s French Quarter. The characters really stood out, and I loved the growth in the main character. It delivered way more than I was expecting.
  9. Widow’s Web by Jennifer Estep: The villain in this installment was a favorite. She was mentally unstable and it was super interesting to see how much her traumatic past affected her choices and lunatic decisions.
  10. The Fault in our Stars by John Green: I finally read a John Green book, and it was all I was hoping for. This book is so worth reading. It was much more than a book about kids with cancer. It was about living life and taking risks and being in love and exploring the world and enjoying beauty and the inner strength people can muster when life hands them a basket full of lemons.

Audrey1 Top Ten Tuesdays: Best Books Ive Read So Far In 2013

This year has been a slow reading year, hasn’t it? Also, I have been on a mean re-reading spree, so I won’t count my re-reads in this tally. I am going to count the books I read this year that weren’t published this year, though. My fucks, I have misplaced them.

  1. Redshirts by John Scalzi: (by a landslide) Star Trek nerd? Check. Snarky? Check? Fan of books where time is treated like a gay little ribbon with which to adorn the universe’s particularly festive blouse? Check check and sewn into the neckline, people. Woo! Can someone come read this with me so I have some way to see if my feels make sense? Thanks in advance.
  2. The Bone Palace by Amanda Downum: Only because I’m not letting myself count re-reads, so Drowning City is out. But you guys, a woman made of birds. It’s like Downum’s inside my brain, rooting around for all the things that make my toes curl up like those freaky big lollipops.
  3. Even White Trash Zombies Get the Blues by Diana Rowland: Reviewed with the unstoppable Soulswallo over at Serial Killers.
  4. Blood Oranges by Kathleen Tierney: Because I like my protagonists fucked up and my paranormal with no romance. But lots of fire and exploding werewolves. There really is something wrong with me.
  5. Warp Speed by Lisa Yee: I’m really not over the book trailer where she speaks in Klingon. Or Ramen, who is awesome.
  6. Under the Lake by Stuart Woods: I’m a sucker for a good drowning town. It kind of blows my mind how often the US Army Corps of Engineers finds it necessary to flood perfectly good small- and medium-sized hamlets.
  7. Lady of Devices by Shelley Adina: Because you’d be surprised how often a heroine’s sidekick turns out to be her loyal hen.
  8. The Lobster Chronicles by Linda Greenlaw: Lobsters are more interesting than you’d imagine. For instance, during mating, the lady lobster pees on the dude. Take a moment with that.
  9. Kingdoms of Dust by Amanda Downum: I may have mentioned this series already. Once or twice.
  10. Steam-Powered 2: More Lesbian Steampunk Stories, edited by JoSelle Vanderhooft: I’m only halfway through this 15-story anthology and I can already tell it’s going to be way up there on my Best of 2013 list. So impressive.

What are your favorites reads so far in 2013?





Top Ten Top Ten Tuesdays: Books At The Top Of My Summer TBR List

Top Ten Tuesdays is an original feature created because The Broke and The Bookish is fond of lists. They love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see other’s top ten lists! Each week, they will post a new Top Ten list and everyone is welcome to join. Please link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your post AND add your name to the Linky widget.

This Week’s Question:

Top Ten Books At The Top Of My Summer TBR List

Man, this list took forever. You know why? Because at this point I’ve rewritten it nine times. I just. Can’t. Decide.
So I figure at least this way I’ve got some plan for the first 10 books down on (virtual) paper, and then after that I can go back to being extremely wishy-washy. Maybe.

  1. The Drowning Girl by Caitlin R. Kiernan: Even if I wasn’t a huge Kiernan fan, this book’s up for way too many awards (Tiptree, Locus, Shirley Jackson) to let it sneak past. Also can use it as research for my thesis on the weird trend for drowning girls on book covers.
  2. The Sea-Devil’s Eye (The Threat from the Sea #3) by Mel Odom: All good things must come to an end, and this series too. (ha-CHA!) Spoiler: the villain’s actually a great white shark in disguise.
  3. Redshirts by John Scalzi. Which I may have just read last week. But it’s one of those books that is either so good I need to read it again right away or so annoying I need to read it again right away to figure out why it bugged me so much. My brain is a weird place.
  4. The Last Season, by Eric Blehm: Some people visit national parks in the summer, other people read all about national park tragedies from the safety of under a pack of small dogs in their air-conditioned bedroom. Readers, I am one of those types of people.
  5. Burnt Offerings by Robert Marasco: I’ve seen the movie, and I thought it was quite decently scary, especially for having been made sometime during 19-polyester, but a friend of mine read the book and declared *it* even scarier, so I’m going in! During a very brightly sun-lit day.
  6. Assassination Vacation by Sarah Vowell (reread): Oh who DOESN’T want to go on a road trip with someone who knows the intimate details of every US presidential assassination attempt? That would be so much more interesting than all those stretches of I-89 where all you get are religious channels on the radio (no joke). Plus there’s the whole thing with the vegetarian sex cult that also made teapots. Verily, there’s nothing this book can’t do.
  7. Wolf in the Shadows by Marcia Muller (Sharon McCone #14): Because I am on a mission to finish this series. And yes, I’ve been putting off this book for like six months because it takes place in San Diego and not San Francisco and involves romantic entanglements, but I will be strong, and I will make it through to #15, Til the Butchers Cut Him Down. With my series or on it.
  8. Unfamiliar Fishes by Sarah Vowell: Is this cheating? There’s just something about Sarah Vowell’s books that says summer to me, though. And I’ve been saving this one for quite a while. Plus it has one of my favorite trailers ever.
  9. Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor: I’ve heard really amazing things about this book. I have not seen one negative review of it.
  10. The Town That Drowned by Riel Nason: Visions, floods, awkwardness, underhanded property dealings. I’m in. Oh, and I should mention my love of drowning towns. That might help explain. Or it might not.

Anyway, what’s at the top of your reading list?

 Audrey1 Top Ten Tuesdays: Books At The Top Of My Summer TBR List





Top Ten Tuesdays: Roam Where You Want Too

Jun
04
3 COMMENTS • This post is filed under: Top Ten Tuesdays

Top Ten Top Ten Tuesdays: Roam Where You Want Too

Top Ten Tuesdays is an original feature created because The Broke and The Bookish is fond of lists. They love to share their lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see other’s top ten lists! Each week, they will post a new Top Ten list and everyone is welcome to join. Please link back to The Broke and the Bookish on your post AND add your name to the Linky widget.

This Week’s Question:

Top Ten Books Featuring Travel In Some Way

ash sign Top Ten Tuesdays: Roam Where You Want Too

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  • The Fault in Our Stars: Hazel and Augustus travel to Amsterdam to fulfill Hazel’s “Make A Wish,” so to speak. It does not go over as they hoped, but it was an pivotal moment to add to their amazing time together.
  • Meant to Be: This enjoyable book takes place in London, and we get to see many of the wonderful parts of a city that I love!
  • Magisterium: I chose this book because it takes place between alternate realities that are separated by a fence. I loved how starkly different both realities are, and how instantaneous the change was once you crossed the barrier. I truly loved the world-building in this book!

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  • Songs of Magic series: These books take place in the modern day world, but the human characters are transported to Fairy at some point, and the Fairy characters are transported into our world. It adds a lot of fun and zany moments!
  • Abandon trilogy: These books bounce around between the modern day world and Hades. Mmmmm, I do love me some Hades, aka John, time.  
  • Stolen: This book takes us to the vast outback of Australia, where we get up close and personal with the MC’s abductor. This book is INTENSE.
  • In the Path of Falling Objects: This book is one big road trip from hell!

Audrey1 Top Ten Tuesdays: Roam Where You Want Too

  1. The Iron Duke, by Meljean Brook: travel by airship! Lots of airships! All over zombie-infested lands, huhzzah!
  2. The Hearse, by Henry Clement: travel by uh, hearse.
  3. Snowblind, by Robert Sabbag: travel while covered in cocaine. Try not to act suspicious.
  4. Dead Presidents (Exponential Apocalypse #2), by Eirik Gumeny: Travel all over the post-apocalyptic wasteland, pursued by basically everyone you’ve killed in the past three days. Plus English majors. And scientists. And a squirrel.
  5. Be Brave, Be Strong: A Journey Across the Great Divide, by Jill Homer: Travel more than three thousand miles, from Canada to Mexico, on a bike. In a race. A week after your long-time boyfriend breaks up with you. (An amazing book.)
  6. Grubs (aka Nasty Little F!#*kers) by David McAfee: travel at high speed through the woods of Maine, pursued by carnivorous insects. Also zombies. Maine’s horrible, y’all.
  7. Backpacked: A Reluctant Trip Across Central America, by Catherine Ryan Howard: Does what it says on the cover. The author uh, basically got dragged across Central America by her much more enthusiastic friend. I was deeply sympathetic.
  8. The Road Trip, by Tina Lencioni: Book 3 in the Kate McCall PI series, and yes you have to read them in order. Features a trip from Seattle to Los Angeles and scenic environs nearby, undertaken by people who can’t stand each other, and some of whom are blood relatives. Now excuse me while I go whoop for joy that Book 4′s finally (finally!) been announced.
  9. Kiki Strike: Inside the Shadow City, by Kirsten Miller: Travel to and through a city very like the one you live in, except entirely underground and abandoned and possibly filled with rats and things bigger than rats that are terrifying.
  10. The Riddle of the Sands, by Geoffrey Knight: Travel around with four other hot dudes, kicking international spy ass in exotic locales and while parting with your virtue at least once a day to get information from informants before racing to the next locale.





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